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334 Growth, Passion, and Learning with Sandra Calleros : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

334 Growth, Passion, and Learning with Sandra Calleros : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

3/14/2016 4:13:10 AM   |   Comments: 0   |   Views: 337

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VIDEO - DUwHF #334 - Sandra Calleros



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AUDIO - DUwH #334 - Sandra Calleros



Dr. Calleros has been providing life enhancing dentistry for more than 29 years in the South Bay communities.  She received her Bachelor of Science in Biology from University of California, Riverside and her Doctor of Dental Surgery from University of California, Los Angeles.  Go Bruins!  Along with private practice, she has been an instructor at the UCLA Dental School’s Restorative Department. 

 

Continuing education is extremely important to Dr. Calleros, as she spends countless hours taking courses to ensure she stays at the forefront of dentistry. She has taken many courses in advanced esthetics, occlusion, and treatment planning at the world-renowned Scottsdale Center for Dentistry.   Taking advanced courses in Invisalign Orthodontics has given her Preferred Invisalign provider status.  Her latest study is in implant dentistry and she has recently attained a Fellowship in the International Dental Implant Association.   She is one of the first and only Laser Certified Dentists in the South Bay.  Her continuing education will not stop here, as she understands the importance of staying ahead with current dental research and technology. Her latest achievement is the addition of cone beam computerized technology (3-D radiology).  She uses this for diagnosis of oral pathology, endodontic root canal treatment, and digital implant planning. This seamlessly integrates with CEREC technology, one-visit crowns.  She has earned the distinction of becoming a mentor for advanced CEREC classes at the Scottsdale Center and is a proud member of CERECDOCTORS.com.

 

Dr. Calleros loves dentistry because she can combine science with art to create not only beautiful, but more importantly, healthy smiles.  From the start of her private practice she has always upheld the highest level of ethics and integrity. You can trust that Dr. Calleros will listen to each individual need and provide you with optimal care.  She has chosen a team that holds the same beliefs and value system to ensure the entire dental experience can be pleasant, knowledgeable, and treat you like family.

 

Giving back to the community is important to Dr. Calleros.  Each year she joins forces with agencies such as Habitat for Humanity and the 1736 Family Crisis Center to provide dental services to local families who are unable to afford treatment.  She and her team have volunteered at Maria Shriver's Modern House Call for Women in Long Beach, California where they provided uninsured women on-site dental treatment.  In the past, she has volunteered with the South Bay Health District, where she helped low income children and abused women receive much needed dental work.  Giving back does not stop at volunteering her time, she continuously donates to many different charities and participates in local fitness events that raise money for various charities. She and her team recently did over $15,000 of dental treatment on families from a local crisis center.  In September 2015 she not only completed the Avon39 Walk to End Breast Cancer in Santa Barbara, she also raised over $6000.00 towards breast cancer research and treatment.

 

Dr. Calleros understands firsthand the importance of raising a healthy family.  She is a proud mother of two.  Her daughter graduated from San Diego State University and is pursuing a career in the entertainment industry and her son is a firefighter in Scottsdale, Arizona.  An animal lover, she has a beautiful Thoroughbred horse named Face and just added a new dog to her family, named Brandi.

 

Away from the office, Dr. Calleros enjoys many outdoor activities and is quite the weekend warrior.  You will most likely find her riding her road bike along the coast and through the hills of Palos Verdes.  Every year she runs in the Manhattan Beach 10K.  In support of UCLA, she combined three of her favorite activities, swimming, biking, and running, to complete her first triathlon, the Iron Bruin.  She also takes great pleasure in riding her horse and motorcycle, playing tennis, golfing and hiking.  During the summer weekends she spends her time enjoying the South Bay beaches or boating in Arizona, and during the Winter weekends skiing down the slopes of Mammoth.

 

www.drcalleros.com 


Howard:

It is absolutely a huge, huge honor today that Sandra Calleros?

 

Sandra:

Calleros.

 

Howard:

Calleros.

 

Sandra:

Calleros.

 

Howard:

How do you say it in Spanish?

 

Sandra:

Calleros.

 

Howard:

Calleros; came by my house today to film a podcast. I'm so excited because the number 1 complaint I get with the podcast is that, "Howard, every time you podcast interview a dentist, it's a man. Every time you podcast interview a woman, it's a consultant." I try so hard. I call you guy’s unicorns because you're so rare, because half the class now is women. When you were in school how many were in the class, and how many were women.

 

Sandra:

I think it might have been 20 to 30, max: 30 percent max.

 

Howard:

Oh it's 30 percent.

 

Sandra:

Maybe we 25. I don't know.

 

Howard:

That's actually a lot.

 

Sandra:

It's a long time ago and I have bad memory but …

 

Howard:

That's a long time ago?

 

Sandra:

I think it was about 25 percent maybe.

 

Howard:

I go to the women that I went to dental school with, I begged them to be on the show. I got one the show. The others ones they're all scared, they’re all like … They're just nervous.

 

Sandra:

I'm a little nervous too.

 

Howard:

You're a little nervous?

 

Sandra:

You told me the reason you wanted me to do it is that it would help younger women dentists or maybe young dentists in general. I like helping people even if I'm not that comfortable.

 

Howard:

Well everybody should be out of their comfort zone, every once in a while.

 

Sandra:

Yeah exactly.

 

Howard:

You're hell of a role model for young women dentist. We're in Phoenix and you fell love in Phoenix because you fell in love in Scottsdale, because you and your boyfriend, bike, you motorcycle and all that stuff. You're a big fan of MTS [inaudible 00:01:53] at the Scottsdale Center.

 

Sandra:

Yes, I love the Scottsdale Center.

 

Howard:

Why do you love the Scott ... would you have loved it if it had been the Phoenix center? See I always tease MTS because I love in Phoenix, that's where all the poor people live and all the rich people love in Scottsdale.

 

Sandra:

Well it is in Scottsdale and that's just how I happened upon it.

 

Howard:

The difference between Phoenix and Scottsdale, is if you live in Phoenix and own a Lexus, have a Lexus or Mercedes, it's pay for cash. If you go to Scottsdale, it's on a lease.

 

Sandra:

I lease my car too.

 

Howard:

Scottsdale's motto is “fake it till you make it.” Anyway, tell me why you love the Scottsdale Center? Is it just because MTS [inaudible 00:02:32] is so charismatic?

 

Sandra:

When you walk in, it's all of a sudden, "Wow." I think, that's how you want your dental practice to be too. Great first impression. I think the people they hire there are top notch people. They really seem to have a passion for dentistry. They're really good with people.

 

 

I think the best people teach there. Frank Spear, I was looking for the collision course and coincidentally it was Frank Spear who was teaching there. I signed for one course and it just blew me away. I just kept taking course after course after course over the years. My office practice was slow at the time. It was 2009, I think when the economy was ...

 

Howard:

Rock bottom.

 

Sandra:

It was horrible.

 

Howard:

It crashed 2008 and 2009 was rock bottom.

 

Sandra:

Things were slow so I just took the opportunity to spend extra time taking, great continuing education. I was just lucky that I stumbled upon the Scottsdale Center because it led to one thing and then to another thing and then to where I am now.

 

Howard:

Talk about the things, the one thing, the second thing, the third thing. You started off with a Frank Spear, I assume treating the worn dentition. Was that your first class?

 

Sandra:

It's like one of those. Maybe it was facially generated treatment planning which I think everybody should take. It's just the basic, I think intro course at the Scottsdale Center. That led to another seminar which led to the workshops. I think I did every single class. I got into the Spirit Faculty Club. At that time, I was renting space and I didn't have my own office but that was my plan, to build my own office.

 

Howard:

You're in Manhattan beach, California?

 

Sandra:

Yeah, I live in Manhattan beach and I work in ...

 

Howard:

See I thought you lived in San Bernardino because this was the Mexican American princess during the Ross Bowl Parade. You were weren't you?

 

Sandra:

I was.

 

Howard:

You were the Mexican American princess. Are you still the princess?

 

Sandra:

No, now I'm a queen.

 

Howard:

Now you're a queen. When you go to the Scottsdale Center, do you stay in there, princess?

 

Sandra:

Well we did have a little condo that we're renting for a while but now I do stay at the Princess or I can stay at my son’s.

 

Howard:

You've graduated from a princess in San Bernardino, to now you're a queen in Manhattan Beach?

 

Sandra:

I live in Manhattan Beach and my practice is in El Segundo, which is right next to Manhattan Beach.

 

Howard:

Which is I assume near LA.

 

Sandra:

Yeah. The LAX international airport is in El Segundo.

 

Howard:

Right on.

 

Sandra:

One of the Pattison branch is in El Segundo, one of their main branches. I'm a big Pattison supporter. I feel like they did help me build my practice.

 

Howard:

You went from renting to building your own?

 

Sandra:

Yes.

 

Howard:

You own the land and building?

 

Sandra:

Well I wish I did, no. I just own the practice. I don’t own the building.

 

Howard:

Okay so you're renting a practice and now you own it?

 

Sandra:

I was renting space from other dentists for a long time. I had my two kids ... I kind of wanted to wait until my kids were at least done with high school. I was working. It's just less responsibility if you can rent space. When you have your own practice, it's a lot more responsibility.

 

Howard:

Let's talk about that. True or false: because we're about the same age; even though you look 10 years younger than me, we're about the same age. I was not the Irish American king in the San Bernardino Rose Bowl Parade. They told us when I got out of school in '87 … What year did you get out of school?

 

Sandra:

Same year.

 

Howard:

'87? Same year?

 

Sandra:

'87.

 

Howard:

They told us, they told all those girls in the class that their total lifelong productivity of how many years and hours they drilled, filled and billed would be probably only half of what the men would do. They were going to all get pregnant, have children and not return to the workforce blah, blah.

 

 

Every one of those women in my class is still cranking out today. I would say the average women in my dental school class, is actually more successful and cranking up more hours and everything than their male counterparts.

 

 

Say the Colorado Dental School; the last graduating class, every single one of them got a job at corporate. The studies I'm seeing nationally for the 56 dental schools is over 60 percent, will go get a job in corporate. Do you think that these people who want to have children, have a family that that's a good idea, to be Mr. Dad or Mr. Mom and own your business, that's just pretty overwhelming?

 

Sandra:

I think it's a big responsibility, like I said. I just had an associate that moved to Austin, Texas. She's working for corporate now. She just started. I think for her, I think it's …

 

Howard:

Which corporate did she go to?

 

Sandra:

Pacific dental.

 

Howard:

Which is Steve Thorn?

 

Sandra:

I don't know. It seems like it might work out for her because I think with her loans from school, and then how much she would have to come up with to start her own practice, it seems like it's just a lot these days.

 

 

I did hire a new associate. She's 27. She's been out of school for a couple of years. She doesn't have any kids yet. I think either being an associate or maybe working for corporate isn't a bad idea when you're first starting out and you want to have kids.

 

 

I think if you have kids, your focus should be on your kids. Maybe you can't focus on dentistry as much as you would like to, if you have children. I think it's individual. If you have a stay at home husband, maybe you can take care of your kids. I think that exists too. I don't know anybody who's doing that but I don't see why that cannot be something.

 

Howard:

You're out there in California. There’s 5 dental schools in California. 10 percent of all the dentists in the United States, are in California. The saturation of dentists in California, makes places like Idaho, Montana and Kansas just look like, they need to build a 100 dental schools.

 

 

What would you say to a young kid in one of those 5 dental schools say, "You know I'd like to practice in Manhattan Beach,” or any of those nice areas and all that. Do you think that is just completely insane in that you just have to go far inland or far away or would you say, "You know what, if you're passion is you want to practice in Manhattan beach and live by the ocean just do it. “ What would you say?

 

Sandra:

I think if you really wanted to do it, I think you could do it. Like they say, “The cream always rises to the top.” If you're passionate and you're really focused on it and that's your dream and you're willing to put in the effort, then I think you can do it.

 

 

There's a lot of doctors that are … They've been practicing a long time and I know they're not putting a lot of effort. I think, some of those people are your competition. I think you could easily do it.

 

Howard:

That's great advice, because my 4 boys, whenever we're going to dinner or out with them, they bring their friends with them, they're saying, “What do you think about going into this business or that business.” I was talking about their two uncles that went into construction in Kansas. There's nothing new in construction really, I mean it’s the same old deal. They built the largest construction company in Kansas and they said, "From the beginning, the thing they noticed that nobody talked good about the construction people, they didn't show up on time, they didn't do their job. If they fail and you call them back they wouldn’t come back.”

 

 

They just said everybody was so crappy that they were just going to go in there and do good work, and warranty everything and be a man of their word and be on time and show up with a white shirt and tie, when all their competitors have 3 inch of their butt cracking out. They built … Key Constructions is one of the biggest companies.

 

 

When I go around, it’s just like almost every business you go into America is lame. I tell everybody to open up their own business because, I believe 90 percent of your customers are going to be lame. You're right. If you go in there and it doesn't matter if you go into the UFC or you want to be a prize fighter, whatever. The best will always rise to the top.

 

Sandra:

Yeah, I agree with that totally.

 

Howard:

Scottsdale Center, I always associate with Paterson. There seems to be Paterson … I don't know the logistics of it, but it's very Paterson dominant. You say Paterson really helped you, go from space sharing to having your own office?

 

Sandra:

Yeah and it wasn't like I sought out Patterson. One of their reps happened to walk into my office one day, back when I was renting from someone else. I developed a relationship with him and then I developed a relationship with their equipment specialist, who is now the manager of the branch, in El Segundo. His name is Jason Owens.

 

Howard:

Jason Owens?

 

Sandra:

Jason Owens in El Segundo.

 

Howard:

In where?

 

Sandra:

El Segundo.

 

Howard:

El Segundo, just like E-L ...

 

Sandra:

2 words. El Segundo.

 

Howard:

El Segundo. My Hispanic patients call me El Gordo Gringo. Is that good? Does that mean handsome? I assume that means handsome in Spanish. They say, "El Gordo Gringo." Jason Owens; he was an equipment specialist, now he's a branch …

 

Sandra:

He would go … I would find the space that was for rent, and I'd say, “Jason can you come out and check out this space for me.” He'd sit down on the ground with his laptop, and he'd map it out and say, “You could put your front office here.” He just looked and looked. We looked and looked until actually I finally found the right space. By then he was already the manager and there was another equipment specialist.

 

Howard:

How many places that he go to?

 

Sandra:

I looked at a lot.

 

Howard:

How many did you take Jason to?

 

Sandra:

Probably 5, 6 or 7.

 

Howard:

Now you know they only do that with hot dentists. They would never do that for a bald dentist. They're just like, “Get the blueprints and drive them by my office.” You got Jason to go with you. You also, seems like looking at your website, talking to you, you kind of fell in love with CEREC.

 

Sandra:

I love CEREC. At the Pattison branch they invited us to come over and take a look at this machine. The first time I saw a crown being milled, I was like, "Oh my God, I love this machine, I'm going to marry this machine.” I just fell in love with it. I was so fascinated by it and at that time I was still renting space. As soon as I built my office I thought, "Okay in about a year then I'll able to afford it. It was less than a year, maybe 6 months later. I said, “I want the CEREC machine.”

 

Howard:

The reality is, in everything is, the devil's in the details. When I see a CEREC machine, it really works in some offices, doesn't work in other offices, so why does it work in your office?

 

Sandra:

Well you have to know there's a high learning curve. I remember, my first case,  I did it was an Onlay and it fit great and I thought what are they talking about. This is easy. Then I kept using it. It's not easy. I did call the tech support every day, it seemed like and I was calling out my friend in Manhattan Beach, Steve Ozer. He's kind of like a mentor for me.

 

Howard:

Steve Ozer?

 

Sandra:

Steve Ozer.

 

Howard:

Is that a dentist?

 

Sandra:

Yes.

 

Howard:

O-S-E-R?

 

Sandra:

O-Z-E-R.

 

Howard:

O-Z-E-R?

 

Sandra:

Yes.

 

Howard:

Wow what kind of a name is that, with a Z.

 

Sandra:

It's Russian or something.

 

Howard:

It's got to be Russian or Turkish?

 

Sandra:

I think he has a Russian background.

 

Howard:

Does he have a CEREC machine too?

 

Sandra:

Yes so he had already a CEREC for 8 years and he was just starting to get into training. He lives in Manhattan Beach and his practice is in Manhattan Beach. I kind of knew him, but not really. Now we're good friends. He was my first trainer in the office. I would call Steve all the time and then being a member of cerecdoctors.com, you can upload your cases.

 

Howard:

By the way, cerecdoctors.com was formed on Dental Town. That’s started on Dental Town by Sameer Puri and I think [inaudible 00:15:47] . I feel like I’m the proud father of cerecdoctors.com. I mean every one of their initial … I bet the first 500 people that were first on dentaltown.com, I'm the proud father of cerecdoctors.com

 

Sandra:

That's amazing.

 

Howard:

Is it CEREC doctors.com or .net?

 

Sandra:

Com

 

Howard:

.com, okay.

 

Sandra:

What was I saying?

 

Howard:

That you thought that joining cerecdoctors and having a mentor was helping you. There was a long learning curve.

 

Sandra:

Owning a CEREC you know, I think it takes about a year before you're finally comfortable. Now, I love social media, I love technology. I'm friends with Mike Skramstad.

 

Howard:

Sure.

 

Sandra:

He's one of the faculty at Scottsdale cell. Now, if I have a problem I don't spend time uploading the case. I tend to get my Iphone out, I take a screenshot and say, “Mike what's up with this.” and he'll answer me in like 2 minutes.”

 

Howard:

I actually bought the CEREC 1 back in the 80's. I had a CEREC 1 before any of those Skramstad, Sameer Puri and those guys were even in Grammar school. Then it was CEREC 2, then it was CEREC 3. When you started, what did you start with? CEREC 3? CEREC 3?

 

Sandra:

4.

 

Howard:

You started with CEREC 4?

 

Sandra:

I think it was 4

 

Howard:

Or the blue Omnicam.

 

Sandra:

Well I have the bluecam and I got it at the end of 2011. I think it was 4.

 

Howard:

What I like most about it was, I think one of the fundamental basics of quality dentistry is magnification. I think the dentists that go from the naked eye to 2X, to 3X, is just, that's the road up. Endodontist with a microscope.

 

 

What I love the most about my CEREC is that, you would scan that prep. I mean the first time you ever scanned when you look at your prep, did Stevie Wonder prep. Was that a blind dentist or was it Ray Charles? I mean who did that ugly prep. Talk about your prep, when you scan the prep, and you look at it, 40 times larger, what percent of times does that make you go back and do something to your problem.

 

Sandra:

I think it’s made me a better dentist because I really pay more attention to my preps. I feel bad for some of the lab techs in the past before CEREC. I would say you know, "Why is he telling me to take an impression? What a dumb lab tech".

 

 

Now I feel bad because probably I did send them some bad impressions. I didn't maybe clear the margin like I should have. I don't go back too often, times I go back and re-prep are usually because I didn't reduce enough. I don't have enough clearance.

 

Howard:

Let me talk about some of the negatives I see on CEREC. If you’re talking to a prosthodontist, he says, "Most all my cases are multiple units.” For them it's so much faster to do impression. All right, when you do a CEREC, Mike Titola always says [inaudible 00:18:58], 96 out of 100 crowns came in, one at a time. Is the CEREC machine for you, one tooth at a time, or you’re doing multiple units. If you had a big case, and it’s a woman needing 10 veneers or 4 crowns, would you use CEREC or would you go back to traditional?

 

Sandra:

If I had a big case I might want to call in Eddie Corellas. He’ll come to your office and he's a wizard at … He'll bring in extra milling machines and he knows how to scan himself. You do a lot of prepping and he'll do most of the work. I did try …

 

Howard:

You bring Eddie into your office?

 

Sandra:

Yeah. Well I haven’t …

 

Howard:

He's an amazing man. I love Eddie. I love that guy

 

Sandra:

Have you had him in your office?

 

Howard:

No because, I'm in Phoenix. Well I guess he does fly around

 

Sandra:

He travels. He goes all over.

 

Howard:

Yeah. He's contacted us to do a podcast. We need to …

 

Sandra:

Oh you should get Eddie. He's a character.

 

Howard:

That would be a good one. We should release his after yours.

 

Sandra:

Yeah, have Eddie. He's funny.

 

Howard:

Now, where's he out in California. By any chance, [inaudible 00:19:53] San Bernardino?

 

Sandra:

He's in San Diego.

 

Howard:

He's in San Diego.

 

Sandra:

One time I brought in this other lab tech and I did 10 veneers. It took all day. This tech wasn't … He didn't know CEREC. I just thought ...

 

Howard:

One that case all day, do you, looking back, do you wish on that case you just would have taken an impression.

 

Sandra:

Oh, I regret doing it all today. It's just too long. It's tiring for me, it's tiring for my assistant, tiring for the patient and it’s just, I won't do it. I don't do every case on CEREC. I don't think you should have to do every case just because you have it. You're still going to send something ...

 

Howard:

That's seems to be the human condition. Humans are never moderate. They're always right, left, up down, black, white, red, yellow. You know they're binomial. CEREC works when you're not an extremist when you say, "Hey if the patient wants it today or it’s a single tooth or the schedule fits.” It seems like a lot of people will buy a CEREC machine and tell their lab man goodbye, and just torture themselves.

 

Sandra:

No, I don't like to torture myself. Even now, with the imprint crowns. I’ve been doing most by myself and I love the way they turn out, but even lately I’m like, “Oh do I want to spend the extra time.” If it's like 2, 19 and 20, I might pour it up and have my lab tech do it. Or maybe I'll just mill it and let them finish the case. I'll start and let him finish it because I just don't want to spend that extra time doing the lab work.

 

Howard:

What about the assistance? How much are you delegating the CEREC to them? Because I'm really bad. I love it the most when the hygienist dumps the tooth, I go and there and prep, then I'm in another realm pulling wisdom teeth and a root canal and an hour and a half later, they go in there and we cement.

 

Sandra:

Yes.

 

Howard:

Then I'll meet a dentist and they'll ask me some technical question about CEREC and I haven't had one for 2 decades. I don't even know what they're talking about. I mean Gian and Yonee they do all that stuff.

 

Sandra:

Well in the beginning I wanted to do everything. I was having too much fun with it. I loved doing it. I loved designing it. I became pretty fast. Then I hired this consultant recently. She said, "You need to let your assistants, you need to delegate more so he can do ...

 

Howard:

Who's the consultant?

 

Sandra:

I hired Jameson, consultant.

 

Howard:

Cathy Jameson?

 

Sandra:

Yes.

 

Howard:

Out of Texas?

 

Sandra:

I think they're at ...

 

Howard:

I mean Oklahoma, I'm sorry.

 

Sandra:

Yes. We started with them in November.

 

Howard:

How's that going?

 

Sandra:

It's good. She helped us a lot with the scheduling. Now with the CEREC, I'm delegating more to the assistants and I kind of like it. I get a patient now, I do the prep and they can do all the scanning and I can come back and pretty much just check the contacts. If they have a question about the margin, maybe I'll make it really clear. Then they'll say, “Is this where the margin is.” Especially on onlays I think.

 

Howard:

Let's see what you do. If you have cement and there's just open contacts, you just give them a ortho referral.

 

Sandra:

Or doing this line.

 

Howard:

That was a joke.

 

Sandra:

That's the great thing about CEREC. You make a big mistake, or something doesn't turn out quite right. So what? You're not paying a lab $300 to redo your crown. You're going to change it yourself. Just replace it in one visit.

 

Howard:

I wanted to talk about … Why is it that …? You graduated in '87. We've been doing this, coming up on 30 years. Here you are the phenomenon, I always see is that the smart, successful people gone through Scottsdale Center blah blah, are hiring consultants. Every time I meet some poor, nearly bankrupt, unhappy miserable, whatever and I say, "Dude, you haven’t been out of school 5 years. Get a consultant.” They won't do it.

 

 

The next time they see and they bought a $25,000 tech scan occlusal adjustor or they bought a $75,000 laser. They'll buy a shiny object but they won't buy a consultant. Why is it that the successful people are hiring Jameson Consulting and going to the Scottsdale Center and the unhappy people think that's a waste of money?

 

Sandra:

Well, you know I love your podcast. It's just a great way to become exposed to so many awesome people in the industry, is by listening to your podcast or Gary Takac’s. One of your podcasts you were talking about using consultants. I’ve used them in past and I was having some issues in the office. I just decided, I need to work on my leadership skills.

 

 

I learned CEREC, I'm placing implants now. I just started a couple of years ago. I have my XG3D, X-Ray machine in the office, so I'm doing all this high tech stuff but bringing in new things to the office, it does create some stress. “How do we bill it, how do we do it, how you we appoint.” I just thought, I need to work on my leadership skills. I got the idea from listening to podcasts. I got a lot of great ideas by the way from your podcasts.

 

Howard:

You mentioned Gary Takac’s podcast. He actually lives right over by the Scottsdale Center. Did you know that?

 

Sandra:

Yeah, so a lot of good stuff in Scottsdale and Phoenix. I asked one of my CEREC doctor’s friends, Lyndial Kenneth. We wre at a Bicon seminar in Boston. I said, "Do you have a consultant?” He told me about Jameson so I called them and that's how I found out about Jameson.

 

Howard:

Bicon's out of Boston, easy to remember, they both start with a ‘B’ Is that, mostly the more [inaudible 00:25:52] implant or, are you surgically placing the implants or restoring them?

 

Sandra:

I'm not. During Boston it was more of an introductory seminar. I felt, since I just started, I just wanted to stick with one line. I picked Strawman. I picked Strawman because, and I could have picked cheaper implants so that it would have cost me less money to buy, per implant. I wanted a line where I could have a rep come into my office and to just have that support. I need the hand holding as a beginner implantologist. The rep's coming to my office. If I need a part, I don't have it; if I have a question they're just right during surgery.

 

Howard:

That's another phenomenon we always talk about in Dental Town. It seems like everybody's saving money and buying implants online, or placing like 5 or 10 a year and everybody that is crushing it and placing hundreds a year, buys the expensive because they're paying for the rep. [inaudible 00:26:55] Nobel Biocare, it's because he's in love with the rep.

 

 

When you have a relationship with a human being and you love and adore and respect each other, it just gets done. When you get rid of that other human, it's like why is every dentist on Facebook and they're not buying all the supplies online. Almost everyone's buying through Patterson, Shine, Berkhart, Benco because that human, there's more to getting your gauge and Septocaine, than having Amazon delivered to your door. It's that human.

 

Sandra:

I need the humans.

 

Howard:

Well, we all do.

 

Sandra:

My specialist too, they'll come in and help me out. In the beginning ...

 

Howard:

You're placing or restoring?

 

Sandra:

I'm doing both. I took Aaron Guard’s course 2 years ago.

 

Howard:

In the Dominican Republic?

 

Sandra:

Yeah, I went to the Dominican, I placed implants for 3 days in a row.

 

Howard:

Did you just drink on the beach or did you actually go the class?

 

Sandra:

I actually went.

 

Howard:

You did go to the class.

 

Sandra:

I did see the beach.

 

Howard:

Well congratulations.

 

Sandra:

I have seen the beach.

 

Howard:

Most people just go there and drink on the beach for a week and then say they went to Aaron Guard's course.

 

Sandra:

No, I did his course. 3 days of implants in the Dominican and then I went back a year later and did 3 days of just extractions. I felt like I needed … You got to extract the tooth first before you can place an implant. I thought I really need to work on my extraction technique. When you do 3 days in a row of extractions or implants, you just come back with so much more confidence. I learnt how to do PRP which is pretty cool.

 

Howard:

Talk about that, PRP. Platelet rich ...

 

Sandra:

Plasma.

 

Howard:

Plasma. You're drawing blood ...

 

Sandra:

I'm drawing blood.

 

Howard:

Centrifuging it.

 

Sandra:

In the office, something I never thought I would do. I never even used to do surgery.

 

Howard:

You weren't a blood and guts doctor?

 

Sandra:

No, I didn't like seeing blood. I liked everything dry, pristine and pretty. Now I'm into the blood and it's so fun.

 

Howard:

You're no longer the Mexican American princess for San Bernardino in the Rose Bowl Parade. Now you're the blood and guts dentist in Manhattan Beach?

 

Sandra:

Yeah now I'm drawing blood.

 

Howard:

Talk about that. That doesn't scare you? Talk about drawing blood because there's a lot of people there that are, I don't know what percent of dentists …

 

Sandra:

Just the thought of it.

 

Howard:

The thing that is so special about people like ... I always admire the people who want to become pediatric dentists. I’d rather jump off the Empire state building head first.

 

Sandra:

Oh, that would be tough.

 

Howard:

I can't think of anything more miserable. I mean that would be ...

 

Sandra:

One of my instructors wanted me to go into pediatric dentistry. I remember, Dr. McCann. He said, "I think you should to pediatric dentistry." I felt like it that was a compliment but ...

 

Howard:

Oh my god. I don't know what would be more rock bottom. A pediatric dentist or a cosmo-dentist, because I didn't go to school for eight years because some 40 year old lady is coming in and she wants this and they're saying. I don't get the cosmetic dentistry thing either. I like 2 things. I like …

 

 

In dental school, whenever I had an opening I’d go with Susan Wires and Brett Ferguson and Charlie Watson and sit in the pain chair. People coming in and the challenge to help them and to get them comfortable and managing infection or do a root canal. All the blood … I don’t know what percent … What percent of the dentists do you think just like blood and guts?

 

Sandra:

My associate, just the thought of even drawing blood, makes her queasy. I don't know. Probably most of them don't. Most of them probably refer out.

 

Howard:

It’s [inaudible 00:30:40] different.

 

Sandra:

I was one of those for years and years.

 

Howard:

Well you're son's a firemen in Scottsdale, he's not afraid. Was it him running into a building on fire, you decided you can start drawing blood?

 

Sandra:

I went to Scottsdale Center. I took the Spirit courses and then I got my practice. It used to be a tanning salon. It was called Bronze buns. I was going to call it Bronze Buns Dental but I didn't.

 

Howard:

Did they do a lot of bleaching in there?

 

Sandra:

I was thinking we could keep one room, have a tanning bed and do the teeth whitening at the same time.

 

Howard:

Teeth whitening.

 

Sandra:

You have dark skin and white teeth but I didn't do that. What was I saying? When I got my CEREC, being around the CEREC doctors, a lot of them place implants, just knowing them and talking to them, you should start doing it.

 

Howard:

What percentage of the CEREC doctors you think place implants?

 

Sandra:

It's not like this voodoo, like I don't think I could ever do that. Anybody can do it. You can learn it if you put your mind to it.

 

Howard:

That’d be an interesting stat. The data I see, there's about 15,000 CEREC users in the United States, what percent would you think also place implants?

 

Sandra:

A lot of them, I would say … They asked, “Everybody raise your hands. How many of you place implants.” I see a lot of hands going up. I would say 80 percent

 

Howard:

Really?

 

Sandra:

I could be wrong but it's a high, more than 50.

 

Howard:

I need to do a poll on that. Text me, email me. I need to start a poll on that. People buying $150,000 CEREC machines are more likely to be just going for it at many levels including surgery.

 

Sandra:

Yeah because, if you have 3d, the Sirona, Galileos, you can merge your CEREC data with your 3d scan, you're going to design your crown first and then you're going to digitally place your implants, I'm sure you know all this. I'm not telling you anything you don't know.

 

Howard:

I don't.

 

Sandra:

You don't.

 

Howard:

I have no idea what you're talking about.

 

Sandra:

Okay so have your CEREC is made by [inaudible 00:32:48], do you know.

 

Howard:

I was thinking, you're a tri athlete too. Do you know Jay Resnick, the world's ...

 

Sandra:

Yes.

 

Howard:

Do you go by and see him because he's in your backyard, he's the world renowned expert on it. Galileo’s and ....

 

Sandra:

When you live in LA, anybody who's even 12 or 15, 20 miles away … It's not like Phoenix where you might get there in 20 minutes. It could be like an hour and a half or two hours’ drive, just to go that far in LA.

 

Howard:

Have you ever met Jay?

 

Sandra:

Yes I have. I met him in Vegas at the CEREC 30.

 

Howard:

He would like to go on a bike ride with you. He's an iron man. We did iron man together. I know you like biking and all that.

 

Sandra:

Yeah we talked about that.

 

Howard:

You should get on a bike ride because I don't anybody in the world knows more about 3D Galileos, implants, surgical guides, then Jay Resnick and he's right in your backyard.

 

Sandra:

Yeah so being able to do that, we can make … I either send him the side CAT or Cat-Ray which is [inaudible 00:33:50] [company. They make the guides. For me, I feel like it's a safety net. I know exactly how deep my implant’s going to go. It’s not going to go in the wrong direction.

 

Howard:

Now is in Armond near Manhattan too.

 

Sandra:

Armond is in Glendale Pasadena area.

 

Howard:

How far is that from here?

 

Sandra:

Hour and a half.

 

Howard:

Now did you buy a Galileos or do you have Armond …

 

Sandra:

No I bought my own.

 

Howard:

What is Armond’s …? Does he have actually a van that drives up to your office or does he have physical bogey centers?

 

Sandra:

Armond has dentists like me, if you're in my area and you don't have the 3d machine, you can send your patients to me and I'll scan them, or you can send them to Steve Ozer in Manhattan Beach.

 

Howard:

You're part of Armond network?

 

Sandra:

Yeah kind of, just for that. I mean, I've been to his courses. We started CAD-Ray.

 

Howard:

That's very cool. Tell me about that. That’s www.cad … Is it cadray.com

 

Sandra:

That's www.cadray.com

 

Howard:

Is it cadray.com or cad-ray.com

 

Sandra:

It might have a hyphen.

 

Howard:

Explain that?

 

Sandra:

You can send models. If you want to place an implant on tooth number 3, send an upper and lower model or actually just an upper model. They will scan the model for you as if you would with your CEREC and you send your scan to them. If you did your scan at another office, that office can send the scan to CAD-Ray electronically. They have your scan, they have your model. They work with Burbank lab …

 

Howard:

Burbank tony

 

Sandra:

Well in Burbank.

 

Howard:

Who's the owner of that? Tony Sedphulus? Tony Sedphulur?

 

Sandra:

I don't know. You know the owners I don't.

 

Howard:

He's a Russian man, just one of the nicest guys in the world. If you ever go to lab he’ll ...

 

Sandra:

I think I might have met him on the tour of the lab. They use a different software. I think they use Bluesky bio. They will design your crown for you and they'll place it and then you can go on remotely with then, and he'll say, “Do you like it here or here?” “Oh I like it right there.” “Okay. Does that look good?” You can do it that if you want.

 

Howard:

Then you’re going to place …

 

Sandra:

Or you can send it to PsyCat in Germany, you could get it made that way too.

 

Howard:

How long have you been placing them and how many have you placed?

 

Sandra:

I've only been placing for a couple of years and I'm starting to place more and more of them. I’ve gotten into it very slowly but it's starting to pick up more and more. I think I've only done only 10 in private practice. I'm doing 1 or 2  a month.

 

Howard:

Would you say it's got you more motivated and more happy?